It’s Time to Take Back Control of Seattle

Every once in a while, it is worth pausing to ponder carefully on current affairs and our place in history. I’ve come to the unsettling conclusion that, despite the towering cranes and shiny new buildings, there are some deep pathologies running in our city’s veins. Seattle is in crisis. Read the rest at Puget Sound Business Journal.

Olympia Receives a Failing Grade

During the final days of the last legislative session, lawmakers in Olympia — seemingly without much thoughtful consideration — decided to overhaul education in Washington state by giving in to various demands from the teachers’ union. In a flurry of activity, lawmakers reversed a ban on affirmative action, essentially eliminated a basic competency test for prospective K-12 teachers and cut funding to charter schools. What effects will these policies have? Read the rest at Puget Sound Business Journal.

Gov. Jay Inslee’s Green Record Should Raise Red Flags

Every four years the political circus comes to town. Unlike the actual circus, there are neither peanuts nor animals performing tricks. Instead, we get platitudes and pandering politicians who treat Seattle like a giant ATM and leave as soon as the check clears. If we’re lucky, they don’t come during rush hour. Read the rest at Puget Sound Business Journal.

Secular Evangelists Are Bad Ambassadors for Seattle

The church that my wife and I attend has the motto “Every member a minister.” It is meant to serve as an encouragement to be loving and charitable, as well as a reminder that, whoever you are and wherever you go, you represent the Christian faith. Behave accordingly.

Seattle as a whole is not very religious, at least in the traditional sense. Instead, we have invented our own civic religion – a combination of progressivism, environmentalism, social justice and a knee-jerk opposition to anything labeled “conservative.” And we wear this religion on our sleeve for all to see, oftentimes behaving as obnoxiously as the Bible-thumpers we routinely mock. We thump the New York Times op-ed page, instead. 

Read the rest at Puget Sound Business Journal.