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Monthly Archives: September 2015

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

During the most recent Republican presidential debate, frontrunner Donald Trump once again dragged out the still widespread myth that vaccines cause autism. This dangerous fiction was debunked as early as 2002 by the New England Journal of Medicine and has been consistently contradicted by research ever since. As a result, anti-vaxxers changed strategy: Instead of blaming thimerosal for causing autism, they now focus on the vaccine schedule itself, essentially claiming that too many shots in too short of a timespan overwhelms a child’s immune system. Read More »

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

Other than getting a major fact wrong, the worst possible feeling for a journalist is the gut-wrenching notion that all of one’s efforts are for naught. For me, it has become increasingly difficult to escape this dreadful feeling, given the state of politics in America. Read More »

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

Sex is complicated. A lack of communication, psychologists and couples therapists are fond of telling us, is largely to blame. If only we were more open about our desires and intentions, then women wouldn’t be wonder, “Will he ever call me?” and bemused men wouldn’t speculate, “Is she flirting with me?” The era of mixed signals would be over. Though likely too good to ever be true, this utopian vision of human sexual relations could become a reality if only we learned some communication skills from our bonobo cousins. Read More »

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

Quite rightly, our society identifies sources of disparity and works to eliminate them. One such disparity is the relative lack of women in top jobs, such as CEOs and professorships. There are multiple reasons for this, but the only politically correct one is discrimination. The data, however, often point to different conclusions. For instance, in April of this year, PNAS released a study that showed that women were preferred 2-to-1 in academic science jobs. Read More »

Before the British election in May, political analysts were nearly unanimous in their prophesying: The United Kingdom was entering a new era of politics in which it would be joining the rest of the continent in the chaotic world of multiparty coalition governments. The Conservative-Labour duopoly was declared dead. As is so often the case, the prognosticators were only half right. Labour is, indeed, dead. The Conservatives, on the other hand, are alive and kicking and will likely rule Britain for at least the next decade in what will be a de facto one-party system. Read the rest at The National Interest.

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

“Keep an eye on that mole,” doctors are fond of reminding us. Any changes in size, shape, or color might indicate that skin cancer, specifically a melanoma, is forming. Now, a new review article in Trends in Immunology suggests that doctors may also want to tell us, “Don’t scratch that mole, either.” Read More »

This article was originally posted on RealClearScience.

Last week, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette reported that the Fay School in Southborough, Massachusetts was sued by parents who believe that the school’s wi-fi signal is making their 12-year-old son sick. According to the article, their child:

“…suffers from Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome, a condition that is aggravated by electromagnetic radiation. The boy was diagnosed after he frequently experienced headaches, nosebleeds, nausea, and other symptoms while sitting in class after the school installed a new, more powerful wireless Internet system in 2013, the suit says.”

Read More »